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Learning Theories for L&D Practitioners

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★★★★★  “This course was very helpful in understanding different learning theories and how they can be applied to create more effective training programs.” J. Carol L&D Practitioner 

Learning Theories | Online Training Program for L&D Professionals


Program Overview:

This online training program is designed for learning and development professionals who want to learn about different theories of learning and how they can be applied in order to create more effective training programs.

The program is divided into several modules, each of which covers a different aspect related learning theories:

Experiential Learning:

This module introduces you to experiential learning theory. You will learn about how people learn from doing and how this can be used to create more effective training programs. Key concepts covered in this module include Kolb’s Learning Cycle and adult learning principles.

Philosophy of learning:

In this module, you will explore different philosophical approaches to learning. You will learn about how these philosophies influence the way we think about learning and how they can be used to create more effective training programs. Key concepts covered in this module include epistemology and ontology.

Learning theory approaches:

In this module, you will compare and contrast different learning theories. You will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and how they can be used to create more effective training programs.

Motivation theory and learning:

In this module, you will learn about how motivation affects learning. You will explore different theories of motivation and how they can be used to create more effective training programs. Key concepts covered in this module include self-determination theory and expectancy theory.

Behaviorism:

In this module, you will learn about the basics of behaviorism and how it can be used to shape learning experiences. You will also explore some of the key concepts associated with this theory, including reinforcement and punishment.

Cognitivism:

This module will introduce you to the cognitive perspective on learning. You will learn about how people process information and how this affects their ability to learn. Key concepts covered in this module include memory, problem solving, and critical thinking.

Constructivism:

In this module, you will explore the constructivist approach to learning. You will learn about how people create meaning from their experiences and how this affects their learning. Key concepts covered in this module include schema theory and social constructivism.

Critical thinking and evidence-based practice:

In this module, you will learn about how to critically evaluate information and arguments. You will also learn about how to use evidence to support your own practice. Key concepts covered in this module include informal logic and the scientific method.

Knowledge check:

In this module, you will test your knowledge of the material covered in the course. This module includes a final exam as well as a series of quizzes that you can take throughout the course.


Learning outcomes:

By the end of this program, you will be able to:

– Understand different theories of learning and how they can be applied in order to create more effective training programs

– Explain how motivation affects learning and how this can be used to create more engaging training experiences

– Analyze information and arguments using critical thinking skills

– Use evidence to support your own practice

– Test your knowledge of the material covered in the course by taking the final exam.


 

Latest Reviews from Participants in the Program:

★★★★★  “This course was very helpful in understanding different learning theories and how they can be applied to create more effective training programs.” J. Carol

★★★★  “I found this course to be very insightful. It helped me understand how different learning theories can be used to create more effective training programs. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in learning more about how people learn.” K. Lee

★★★★  “This course was very helpful in understanding how motivation affects learning. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in learning more about how to create more engaging training experiences.” S. Hansen


Glossary of Relevant Terms and Concepts from the Program:

 

Learning theory: A set of principles that explain how people learn.

Cognitive development: The process by which people develop the ability to think, remember, and solve problems.

Learning process: The steps that people take in order to learn something.

Social Learning Theory: A learning theory that suggests that people learn by observing others and imitate their behavior.

Transformative Learning Theory: A learning theory that suggests that people can undergo profound changes in their beliefs and values as a result of their experiences.

Cognitive psychology: The study of mental processes such as memory, problem solving, and critical thinking.

Classroom management: The process of creating an environment in which students can learn effectively.

Cognitive learning theory: A learning theory that suggests that people learn by processing information and making connections between ideas.

Educational theories: A set of principles that explain how people learn.

Positive reinforcement: A type of reinforcement that rewards a behavior in order to increase the likelihood of that behavior being repeated.

Supervision and curriculum development: The process of creating an environment in which students can learn effectively.

Prior learning: The knowledge and skills that people have acquired before they begin a new learning experience.

Cognitive theory: A learning theory that suggests that people learn by processing information and making connections between ideas.

Humanist learning theory: A learning theory that emphasizes the importance of the learner’s experience and autonomy.

Zone of proximal development: The range of skills that a person is able to learn with the help of others.

Background knowledge: The information that people already know about a subject before they begin learning new information.

Problem based learning: A type of learning in which students work together to solve problems.

Human development: The process by which people grow and change over the course of their lives.

Personal and environmental experiences: The experiences that people have in their personal lives and the environment around them can affect their ability to learn. For example, if someone has had a lot of experience with a particular subject, they may find it easier to learn new information about that subject. Alternatively, if someone is surrounded by people who are negative about learning, they may find it more difficult to be motivated to learn.

Cognitive constructivist: A type of learning theory that suggests that people learn by constructing their own understanding of the world around them. This includes making connections between new ideas and existing knowledge, as well as testing these ideas through trial and error.

Multiple intelligences: The idea that there are multiple ways of intelligence, and that people learn differently based on their individual strengths.

Learning environments: The physical and social environment in which learning takes place can affect how well someone learns. For example, if a learning environment is stressful or chaotic, it may be more difficult for someone to focus and learn effectively.

Constructivist classrooms: Classrooms that are based on the cognitive constructivist learning theory, in which students are actively involved in constructing their own understanding of the world.

National education association: A professional organization for educators that provides resources and support for teachers.

Educational psychology: The study of how people learn, including the factors that influence learning.

Learning styles: The different ways that people learn, such as visual, auditory, or kinesthetic.

Learner’s ability: The individual differences that affect how well someone learns, such as intelligence, motivation, and prior knowledge.

Cognitive strategies: The different ways that people learn, such as visual, auditory, or kinesthetic.

Teaching practice: The act of teaching in order to improve one’s skills.

Practice skills: The ability to apply what has been learned in a real world setting.

Teacher education: The process of preparing future educators to teach effectively.

Learning experience: The process of learning, including both the positive and negative aspects.

Self directed learning: A type of learning in which students take control of their own learning, often with the help of a teacher or coach.

Intellectual skills: The ability to think critically and solve problems.

Educational philosophy: A set of beliefs about education, often related to the purpose of education and the best methods for teaching.

Observable behavior: The ability to see and understand the behavior of others.

Cognitive processes: The different ways that people learn, such as visual, auditory, or kinesthetic.

Adult students: Students who are over the age of 18.

Student motivation: The desire to learn, often influenced by factors such as interest, goals, and perceived ability.

Humanistic education: An approach to education that focuses on the whole person, including their emotions and social needs.

Construct knowledge: The ability to create new knowledge, rather than simply memorizing facts.

Learning goals: The objectives that students hope to achieve through learning.

Undertakes cognitive operations: The ability to think critically and solve problems.

Critical reflection: The ability to reflect on one’s own thoughts and beliefs, as well as the ideas of others.

Intrinsic motivation: The desire to learn for personal satisfaction, rather than external rewards.

Extrinsic motivation: The desire to learn in order to achieve a goal, such as a good grade or positive feedback from others.

Complex concepts: Ideas that are difficult to understand, often because they are abstract or have multiple parts.

Negative reinforcement: A type of motivation in which someone is motivated to avoid a negative consequence, such as punishment.

Concrete operational: The ability to think logically about concrete (real-world) objects and events.

Formal operational: The ability to think abstractly and solve problems.

Classroom practice: The act of teaching in order to improve one’s skills.

Motor skills: The ability to control one’s body movements.

Mental processes: The different ways that people learn, such as visual, auditory, or kinesthetic.

Psychosocial development: The process of how people develop emotionally and socially.

Prior knowledge: The information that someone already knows that can be used to learn new information.

Own learning: The process of learning that happens when students take responsibility for their own education.

Educational learning theories: Ideas about how people learn, often based on research and observations.

Learning theories develop hypotheses: Theories about how people learn that are based on research and observations.

Adult education: The process of teaching adults, often with the goal of helping them improve their lives.